Category: Time Management and Productivity

BillingBusiness PlanningClient relationsFinancial ManagementLaw Practice Management

Becoming a Cost Center: the Story of Attorney Andrew

image   by Sheila Blackford   ©2016   I get to talk with attorneys who are trying to figure out the best method of increasing business. Should they do a Facebook firm page? Should the try using Google AdWords or try advertising with Yelp! or start a blog, or twitter feed? There are more ways to spend money than to make it. What all lawyers can do is pay attention to what they are spending their money on. A good way to look at expenditures is to view how many hours of work you must spend to pay for this purchase. If you work for a salary, it is easy to calculate your rate of pay. You have your annual salary. You can calculate how your hourly rate of pay from there. If you worked 52 weeks – no time off– then divide your annual salary by 52. If you work 40 hours a week – in your dreams, right?– then divide the weekly salary by 40. What you get is your hourly rate.

This is very different when you work for yourself. You have a billable rate, but you have overhead costs, and you likely do not collect the same amount of money that you bill.  Let me introduce you to Attorney Andrew, admitted to the Oregon State Bar in 2005. Andrew has a billable rate of $200 an hour. He spends six hours working on the Client Carlton matter. He knows he really should have been able to do the work in four hours so he writes the Client Carlton bill down to four hours, $800. Client Carlton is billed $800 and pays $800. There are 10 additional clients billed during the same month totaling $8,400 and is paid only $6,600.

Attorney Andrew’s office rent is $1,200 per month. Allocating 1/12 of the Oregon State Bar annual membership dues equals $46.42; allocating 1/12 of the Professional Liability Fund annual assessment for the basic $300,000 malpractice insurance coverage and additional $50,000 claims expense allowance equals $291.67.

Attorney Andrew’s total gross income is $7,400 for the month. His proportionate expenses are $1,538.09. Attorney Andrew’s net income would be $5,561.91.Will he take the full amount as take home income? Or will he buy more paper and ink for his printer? Or should he save the money as a cushion against any future expenses.

What are Attorney Andrew’s numbers looking like? Attorney Andrew wrote down $200 on the Client Carlton time charges. What amount of time did he write down on the other client matters? If he billed $9,180 but only collected $7,400 then his collection rate for this month was 81%.  $7,400 divided by $9,180 = 81%.  COLLECTION RATE EQUALS THE AMOUNT RECEIVED DIVIDED BY THE AMOUNT BILLED.

But if his time charges entered for the entire month were 60 hours (value = $12,000) and he wrote off 14.10 hours and only billed 45.90 hours (value $9,180), then at his $200 billable rate he was only paid for 37 hours ($7,400). As a result, his realization rate is on 62%. $7,400 divided by $12,000 = 62%. REALIZATION RATE EQUALS THE AMOUNT RECEIVED DIVIDED BY THE VALUE OF TIME RECORDED. 

If you haven’t run screaming from being in front of this blog post, take a look at Attorney Andrew’s net income of $5,561.91. We realize there are other monthly overhead costs besides rent, and 1/12 of the  annual OSB bar membership dues and PLF assessment for malpractice insurance coverage. You can do your own precise calculations with all your numbers. If I told you that Attorney Andrew was somewhat prudent and only paid himself $5,000 gross salary a month, then his gross annual salary is $60,000. Based on 52 week in year, 40 hour work week, Attorney Andrew’s gross hourly rate of pay is $28.85. Considering how proud Attorney Andrew is to have a billable rate of $200 an hour, that gross hourly rate of pay is something else isn’t it?  Well, though painful, it isn’t accurate: don’t forget federal and state taxes and other withholding amounts for social security and medicare that Attorney Andrew must pay. His net pay is not $28.85. It’s less…

For the sake of our sanity, let’s just run with this $28.85 an hour gross hourly rate of pay. Attorney Andrew wants to purchase a new leather sofa long enough to nap on, delivered to his condo from Pottery Barn, he will spend $3,499. Not bad! He better like it because it will take him 121.29 hours to earn the price of that leather sofa based on his $28.85 gross hourly rate. And we won’t talk about the dream car Attorney Andrew is dreaming of buying. It is pretty cool looking for a car.  Okay, I’ll tell you what his dream car is so you can google it and share the dream: the 2016 BMW i8 with a MSRP of $140,700. If Attorney Andrew had a savings account to clean out, it would take 4,876.95 hours based on his $28.85 gross hourly rate to put that baby in his garage. I wonder what his condo cost if it has a garage. Hmm…

So the moral of this story of Attorney Andrew is multi-layered.

  1. Don’t get overly impressed that your billable rate is $200 an hour.
  2. Look at your collectible rate.
  3. Look at your realization rate.
  4. Before falling in love with new furniture and cars, calculate how many hours you will have to work to pay for them.
  5. Before getting more clients, look at how efficiently you are serving the clients you already have.

 

 

 

 

 

BillingBusiness PlanningClient relationsGeneralLaw Practice Management

Economics of Law Practice

image   by Sheila Blackford   ©2016   Another law school year is drawing to a close. 3Ls are looking anxiously in the career center for lists of law firm recruiters and scheduled interviews.  “What is their billable hour requirement?”  1,800 hours? 2,100 hours? 

Wait a minute.  How many hours do you have to work in order to bill that many hours? A typical work week is 40 hours a week. 52 weeks in a year. 40 x 52 = 2,080 hours. What about vacation time? Holidays off? How can you have New Year’s Day, Marin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas or Winter Holiday. And what about two weeks off to go skiing or camping, or to Disneyland with the kids?

New associates churn the hours and come back late at night to get more billable hours clocked for the month.  “Have I met the quota? Have I hit the bonus level?”

Wait a minute. Billables are measured in hours. The pressure to bill hours in six-minute increments leads to logging six minutes but speeding to actually spend four minutes which starts to add up. For example, 60 minutes in an hour, 480 minutes in eight hours billed but in actual time of four minutes worked for six minutes billed would be 40 minutes or 320 minutes worked to generate 480 minutes billed. I know it sounds far-fetched, because we’d usually work on a client matter for 30 minutes and Bill .5 hours. I’m talking about those quick little client tasks, calling and leaving a voice mail message, reading a court notice, spending a quick email.

Senior partners call associates in and tell them their collectible rate is abysmal and their billables again needed to be written down significantly. “Improvement is mandatory or your future at this firm is unlikely.” 

Wait a minute. Collectibles are measured in dollars. The senior partner isn’t reluctant to alienate a client with a bill that looks inflated. So hours are written down to match client budgets or the senior lawyer’s awareness of how longish reasonable to spend on preparing a client letter versus a pleading. And then that $1,000 bill goes to the client who may pick up the phone to announce he isn’t paying a dime above $950. So another $50 is written off. The client pays the $950. The associate is dismayed to learn that his six hours billed turned into four hours collected. When he stops to consider he skipped lunch and spent ten hours in the office, things are looking grim. Let’s look at these numbers as ratios.  The lawyer worked ten hours, billed for six hours, and collected for four hours. 10:6 billable ratio means he works 1.67 hours for every hour billed. 10:4 collectible ratio means he works 2.5 hours for every hour collected.

Some firms pay the associate a salary and pay a bonus for meeting bonus objectives. What is the bonus based on? The associate isn’t home free. The salary is based on meeting the billable rate. So if you’re not meeting that billable rate, you will likely not last long. It has been said that it takes three years for a law firm to begin making money on an associate. That may be true, but looking up the bar number of the associates at a firm that typically hires three newly admitted lawyers a year, may reveal that maybe one of the three is around for year two. It looks like more firms are quick to cut their losses on an unpromising associate.

Some small firms may try to get a little too clever with compensation programs and run afoul of wage and hour claims by trying to dock a salary in a month following low billable hour achievement. Or trying to play fast and loose with categorizing the associate an independent contractor instead of an salaried employee.

There are federal and state indicia of employment status of a contractor versus an employee. Law firm employers need to be careful and consult with an employment lawyer if any questions. Associates need to be careful and ask questions about expectations about billables and collectibles. And if they have questions, they too may want to consult an employment lawyer.

 

Business PlanningEthicsLaw Practice ManagementLawyer AssistanceProfessionalism

The Gift of Time

 

image    by Sheila Blackford   ©2015   The 2015 holiday season is in full swing. This time of year, many lawyers question if they should leave their law firm and go solo or start up their own multi-attorney firm or just hang it up and retire or switch careers. These are all things that are best to think about. I just question whether this might not be the best time to be making such life changing decisions. It’s a bit like deciding whether to get a divorce. Good to consider but with the stress of the holidays and busy pace of visiting family and friends, this may not be the time when you can do your best thinking. Can you give yourself the gift of time?  Why, you ask? To give yourself time to consult with a good lawyer: yourself.

Take the time to think things through.

  • Can you see where this decision leads?
  • Do you need to sit down with a financial advisor to crunch numbers?
  • What about covering health insurance for you and any family members?
  • What practical considerations are needed in place to help you in the first six-month transition period?
  • Do you have the stomach for flying solo or weathering difficult relationship issues involving sharing control and maintaining trust?
  • If employees will be involved, do you have all the human resources areas taken care of before you create a BOLI complaint or lawsuit?
  • Do you need to sit down with a CPA and your tax returns and financial projections to determine your right choice of entity?
  • Should you and your prospective law partners do Myers Briggs, Strengthfinders, or some other psychological testing to determine if you really will bring compatibility and balance to the planning table?

Know your resources.

Oregon State Bar Economic Survey.

Oregon Attorney Assistance Program Attorney Counselors. For assistance with career planning and counseling.  503-226-1057  or 1-800-321-6227

  1. Shari Gregory, LCSW, JD on Ext. 14.
  2. Kyra Hazilla, JD, MSW on Ext. 13.
  3. Mike Long, JD, MSW, CEAP on Ext. 11.
  4. Douglas Querin, JD,LPC, CADCI on Ext.  12.
  5. Bryan Welch, JD counseling intern on Ext. 19.

Oregon State Bar General Counsel’s Office for assistance with ethics questions arising in the practice of  law. 503-620-0222 or 1-800-452-8260

  1. Helen Hierschbiel, General Counsel on Ext. 361. Will become Executive Director of OSB January 2016.
  2. Amber Hollister, Deputy General Counsel on Ext. 312. Will become General Counsel of OSB January 2016.

Oregon State Bar Client Assistance Office for assistance with initial screening of ethics complaints about lawyer conduct. 503-620-0222 or 1-800-452-8260

PLF Attorney Practice Management Advisors for assistance with the business of practicing law, including closing a law practice, departing from a  law firm, retiring or selling a law practice, or opening a new law practice.  503-639-6911 or 1-800-452-1639

  1. Sheila Blackford, JD on Ext. 421.
  2. Hong Dao,  JD on Ext. 412.
  3. Jennifer Meisberger, JD on Ext. 411.
  4. Beverly Michaelis, JD on Ext. 415.

PLF Claims Attorneys for assistance with handling situations where there is a concern of a potential malpractice claim. The receptionist will connect you to an available claims attorney.  503-639-6911 or 1-800-452-1639

PLF Practice Aids and Forms

 

ResourcesTime Management and Productivity

Has It Become Too Late Too Soon?

JEL23652-Blackford, Sheila P3 (2)   by Sheila Blackford   ©2012

Happy New Year!

I was joking with my husband about running out of time to get something done before it was too late: “I hate when it’s too late too soon!”  Maybe I’m on to something here.  Running out of time may have been part of 2011. Maybe it has even crept into 2012. Well, luckily, goals are something we set for ourselves and often achieve with great enthusiasm. Other goals we hit a couple of times and then miss a couple of times and give up, discouraged. You may be confusing goals with resolutions because ’tis the season to be confused about setting goals in the new year when we likely are expressing our resolutions. Goals are measurable – “My goal is to lose ten pounds.” Resolutions are for our continuous effort, “My resolution is to eat healthier. ”  For more on Resolutions, see Rod Ibrahimi’s January 2, 2012 post on Lifehacker, “The Science Behind New Year’s Resolutions (And How to Use it to Achieve Yours!)” and to get more clarity around the difference between goals and resolutions, I like David Galloway’s December 31, 2011 post on Lifehacker, “Differentiate Between Goals and Resolutions to Aid in Personal Achievement.”

Now, has it become “too late too soon?” It is the start of a new year. Make it your resolution to learn better strategies for managing your time.

Here are some of my favorites.

1. MindTools. You can do some serious self-improvement on this website! Here is the link to their excellent Time Management Toolkit. I recommend you take the Time Management Quiz to understand what can best help you. Time to get honest.

2. Pomodoro Technique. If you struggle somedays with wasting more time avoiding doing something than the something would take, you may be having some anxiety about getting it done. You think?! Time management gurus advise breaking tasks down into smaller chunks. Very helpful. What the Pomodoro Technique can do is take it one step further, a timer that ‘tells’ you it is time to work in a sustained fashion for just 25 minutes. You are ‘supposed’ to put a checkmark on a piece of paper. I have an iPhone App that tracks my completed pomodoros. Forget the paper – just more clutter on my desk! Then ‘tells’ you it is time to take a break for 5 minutes. After a set of four pomodoros, you take a longer break. Simple. Now try to stick with it. It certainly is a tool for tackling that tough one that you shuffle off to the side of your desk. Try it. It may work. Carol Wilson was Oregon’s first Practice Management Advisor. She used to kindly advise breaking down tasks into small increments. I don’t know if she was a fan of the Pomodoro Technique. But the principle is the same: break it into doable portions. Eat the elephant one bite at a time.

3. Getting Things Done! ®David Allen.  He has quite a following. A favorite place to begin with the idea is to take the Getting Things Done Quiz which is called,  GTD>Q  and available free. More good assessment. There is a  G T D® Starter Kit that may interest you if you want to leap into the program with both feet, complete with CDs and exercises and other content for $79.98. But I would cautions some of you to be careful to not avoid tackling something that needs tackling by getting focused on doing the G T D® Starter Kit instead of just working on one piece of what needs to be done. You know who you are!

 

4. Get some personal one-on-one or group coaching. Those of you reading this in Oregon can contact the Oregon Attorney Assistance Office and ask Meloney Crawford to include you in her, Getting It Done 2012 ® program.  Don’t procrastinate now, as it starts the second week of January. And you can even attend by online method. What I really appreciate about Meloney is that she doesn’t believe in one-size-fits-all. She will share a number of tools to help you dig in or dig out!

Well, these are my four. What are yours?

Happy resolutions to you!